Archaeological Ruins Near Bimini

From Bimini to Andros psychologist-turned-explorer Dr. Greg Little has identified many sites worthy of further investigation consisting of both ancient, and merely “historical”, era relics.  This is a list and brief summary of the most important finds.

Marble Ruins in 30-feet of water 7-miles North of Bimini
In a well-defined area is a white marble temple pediment and multiple layers of marble beams, slabs, and other marble pieces. These are apparently from a shipwreck in the early 1800s. This extremely impressive “pile” merits salvage and reconstruction on Bimini as a local attraction.

The Bimini Road
While skeptics with a questionable record assert the Bimini Road is a natural formation of beachrock.  Investigations including archaeologist Bill Donato have definitively shown it is the remains of a harbor formation dated to about 3000-4000 B.C. There are multiple layers of stone blocks in many areas, wedge stones under many large blocks, toolmarks on some stones, and some stone anchors there along with ballast stone, small marble, and other interesting artifacts.

Marble and stone columns near the Bimini inlet
Nearly 30 columns or cement cylinders were found with two fluted marble columns in shallow water near the inlet between N. and S. Bimini. The marble columns were taken but fully documented by geologists and others. Some of the supposedly lime-kiln cement columns are still there.

Paradise Point Pier—to the East of the Bimini Road
This is a manmade jetty or harbor that is in some ways more interesting than the Bimini Road. It is a long line of huge stone blocks arranged vertically running for several hundred feet off the coast into deeper water.

Proctors Road—just off the north Bimini shoreline
This is a mile-long irregular line of stone that has 5 spaced stone circles that look identical to what are called “mooring circles” in the Mediterranean.

Stone Anchors near Proctors’ Road
In association with the line of stones called Proctor’s Road are dozens of stone anchors. These are of several types. Some are simple stones that have bore holes that were used as throw-away anchors. However, there are also multi-holed, well-carved stone anchors that are identical to Phoenician anchors. The largest we have found was a 600-pound stone in a heart shape. It was carbon dated to 30 B.C.

Rectangular Formations in 110-feet of water 5-miles off North Bimini
This curious set of 50 or so rectangular forms lying on a flat, sandy bottom was first found by Bill Donato in a side-scan sonar project. There are building blocks on and embedded into several of these. A 2010 ARE expedition with a member of Donato’s team decided that these were probably natural formations, however, the presence of the building blocks is intriguing.

Odd Bottom Formations in 150-350-feet deep water 6 miles off North Bimini
A large area has been side-scanned and filmed that shows intriguing paths, domes, and unusual shapes at this deep-water site. Many of the researchers who have investigated this site believe that it shows manmade features.

Building Ruins in 15-feet of water off South Bimini
We reported on this unexpected find in 2010. This is a clearly defined building foundation with the walls extending down into sand at least 4-6 feet. Dating on the site should be available next month.

Basalt slabs and carved enclosures with steps in 15-feet of water 8-miles south of Bimini
Numerous carved slabs of basalt are located within what appear to be carved enclosures in this area. There is also what appears to be a long, multi-layered wall adjacent to it and carved steps on a wall.

Andros Platform off North Andros
This is a harbor formation made from 3 separate lines of increasingly high slabs of stone in 10-15 feet of water. It dates to 3000 B.C.

Wall near Andros Platform
Well-hidden on high land near the Andros Platform is the remains of a stone wall that predates any local knowledge. It may be associated with pirate activity. It is near Morgan’s Bluff making it likely it was a concealed pirate fortification.

Joulter’s Wall—north of Andros
A definitive wall runs in shallow water between two Joulter’s islands in this seldom visited, difficult to reach location. The wall is made from cut limestone and is clearly manmade, but its function and dating are totally unknown. A large square platform of stone blocks is attached to the wall. Long-term locals state that it has “always” been there. The water leading to these islands is extremely shallow, essentially several miles with depths between one to 5 feet.

Temple remains on Andros at Mangrove Cay
The remains of a temple are found on a high limestone outcrop that runs down Andros. The local owner, Samuel Rolle, is now deceased, and regretted selling most of the blocks from the site to build the local government official’s residence. He was credible and related that there was once a stone temple structure there, but all that remained was evidence of a foundation.

Huge arrangements of stone blocks off the Berry Island chain
This is an anomalous, multi-layered set of huge stone blocks in 30-feet of water off the main Berry Island. It has not been investigated.

Numerous plane and shipwrecks at Bimini and Andros
To date the remains of 24 planes and several shipwrecks have been found. Two of the planes were reported as missing in the Bermuda Triangle. One shipwreck off South Bimini is supposedly Phoenician. Many shipwrecks are found in deep water off Bimini as well as at the Moselle Shoal north of Bimini.

Curious arrangements of stone on the Great Bahama Bank off Andros
There are about 4 sites off western Andros with odd arrangements of stone blocks. Nothing is as yet definitive about these but they lie in shallow areas where large boats cannot travel. Another 100 spots have been identified in aerial surveys that have yet to be visited.

Anguilla Arc at Cay Sal
On the remote island of Cay Sal is what definitely appears to be a harbor made from cut blocks of beachrock. It is at the same depth as the Andros Platform and the Bimini Road. One stone anchor has been found there.

Articles by Dr. Greg Little

The Archaeological Exploration of Bimini from 1968 to 2003

Unselfishness